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What Every Woman Needs to Know About Hypertension?

High Blood Pressure and Women

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What Every Woman Needs to Know About Hypertension

Hypertension occurs when the force of blood pushes against the lining of the arteries. It occurs when the force is increased and gets abnormally high. Scientifically, if the blood pressure is higher than 140 over 90mm Hg, then the patient has high blood pressure. This medical condition has become prevalent because of the sedentary lifestyle.

There is a myth related to hypertension that it is a men’s health issue. However, this is not always the case. Both men and women are prone to develop hypertension in their 40’s. But, after menopause, women are more susceptible to developing hypertension than men. 

The best way to diagnose whether you have hypertension is by getting your blood pressure checked regularly. Read on to know how hypertension affects women and how it can be managed. 

Hypertension: A Silent Killer

Hypertension in women is increasing worldwide. This medical condition is considered a silent killer as it barely shows any symptoms; thereby increasing the risk of heart disease. If not treated, it can affect your arteries and can cause heart attack, damage to the eyes and kidney damage. In severe cases, this condition can even lead to nosebleed, unconsciousness, and headache. 

Symptoms of Hypertension in Women

Hypertension can cause various symptoms in young and middle-aged women. The severity of this medical condition increases with age and it becomes difficult to control blood pressure. 

Increased blood pressure can cause stress on the arterial wall that causes endothelial dysfunction which may lead to chest pain. 

Certain health conditions such as pregnancy, prevention of pregnancy and menopause can increase the risk of hypertension in women. In women, certain risk factors are important indicators for developing premature hypertension. Premenstrual migraine in adolescents occurs more in women than compared to men. This condition is often related genetically to cardiovascular disease. With the increase in age, the persistent headache may also contribute to hypertension. 

Research says that usage of oral contraceptives can lead to hypertension in some women, and increase the chance of developing cardiovascular disease among those having high blood pressure. This condition occurs if you are overweight, have hypertension during pregnancy, and have a family history of hypertension. The habit of smoking and taking contraceptives can be life-threatening.

Women are at risk of developing hypertension after menopause. Once a woman experiences menopause, it may cause changes in hormones that can cause increased weight and salt sensitivity-which may further lead to elevated blood pressure.

Managing Hypertension

In order to manage hypertension women are advised to get their blood check-up done once every six months. To regulate your blood pressure, it is advisable to bring the following changes in your lifestyle:

  • Keep your weight in check
  • Exercise regularly
  • Lower the consumption of salt and processed food
  • Avoid smoking and consumption of alcohol
  • Learn stress management

Health Insurance for women with hypertension

Gone are the days when women used to depend on males for their financial and health security. Today, women are working equally with men in every sphere. Hypertension is one of the most common ailments affecting women. Hence, a woman needs to buy a health insurance plan to avoid an unforeseen contingency. 

Care Health Insurance (Formerly Religare Health Insurance) provides specialized health insurance plans for hypertension patients. Buy health insurance plan for yourself and your loved ones who are suffering from hypertension, by opting for Care Freedom

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