Comorbidities Definition and Increased Risk of Coronavirus: Everything You Need to Know

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comorbidities definition and increased risk of coronavirus everything you need to know

The contagious coronavirus and its new variants are posing severe health risks for everyone. The elderly and especially people with comorbidities are at greater risks. So, taking utmost care and following the safety and social distancing norms to avoid catching an infection becomes the need of the hour. The second phase of India’s vaccination drive started in March, focusing on inoculating senior citizens and people aged above 45 having underlying health conditions.

Comorbidities: Meaning

As per the medical definition, comorbidities refer to the presence of two or more medical conditions in a person. Each condition is referred to as comorbidity, and that could be a mental or physical condition. Usually, comorbidities are non-communicable diseases, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. For example, a person may have asthma and may be diagnosed with another condition like diabetes. Thus, diabetes is considered comorbidity.

The Link between Comorbidities and COVID-19

As per the studies conducted during the pandemic, medical professionals have observed that a significant number of patients with comorbid conditions faced higher risks of infections and health complications. A majority of those patients are individuals having ailments like hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

One thing to note is that such individuals having comorbidities tend to have a weaker immune system, thus becoming more susceptible to COVID-19 illness. Usually, as a person ages, the possibilities of having a medical condition increase. Besides, one is likely to face even higher risks, depending on the severity of the ailment. Thus, it becomes essential to take adequate safety precautions like wearing masks, maintaining social distance, and following good personal hygiene.

We mention below a list of the comorbidities that increase the risks of COVID-19:

  • Hypertension
  • Type-1 & Type-2 Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular conditions
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Kidney Disease
  • COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)
  • Chronic Liver Disease
  • Neurological conditions like dementia

Such patients should take additional care against the virus. It is also essential to get a COVID-19 vaccine if one meets the eligibility criteria. Further, it is advisable to check the list of comorbidities and consult a doctor before going for the vaccination. Individuals aged 45 years need to submit a doctor’s certificate to get registered for the vaccine. 

>>Read: Everything About Coronavirus: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Steps One Can Take to Deal with Comorbidities

Managing these medical conditions by following a healthy lifestyle and adequate healthcare measures is of utmost importance. It is vital for you and your loved ones to take every step possible to avoid the risk of COVID-19. Additionally, the following health tips prove to be highly beneficial:

  • Practice basic hygiene and wear face masks 
  • Eat healthy foods to boost the immune system
  • Lead an active lifestyle, including regular exercises
  • Follow the right treatment plan
  • Go for regular health check-ups

>>Also Read: How to Register for Covid 19 Vaccine in India?

Need for Health Insurance with COVID-19 Cover

Finally, having a health insurance cover in these times of uncertainties is highly valuable as it provides the much-required financial support for any medical contingencies. Choose a comprehensive health policy with COVID-19 cover by Care Health Insurance today. 

Our customised plans provide you with wide-ranging sum insured options with cover for coronavirus treatment and numerous policy benefits suited for your unique medical needs. Also, you can access our nearest network hospital for cashless medical treatment and stay worry-free about medical expenses. 

Disclaimer: The information given in this article is only for reference purpose. We recommend consulting a medical practitioner.